WILD HORSES AND BURROS

WHAT IS A MUSTANG?

WILD HORSE ISSUES

CURRENT ACHIEVEMENTS

WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP

WHERE CAN I VIEW WILD HORSE HERDS?

SULPHUR HERD

ADOPT A HORSE

NEWSLETTER & MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

PHOTO GALLERY

Where Can I View Wild Horse Herds?
BLM Herd Management Areas

Sulphur Herd Objectives

Special Travel Considerations

Best Viewing Opportunities

  A Few Viewing Tips

We Need Your Help


BLM Herd Management Areas

     In 1971, Congress passed legislation to protect, manage, and control wild horses and burros on the public lands.  The Wild Free Roaming Horse and Burro Act declared these animals to be "living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West."
     Congress further declared that "wild free-roaming horses and burros shall be protected from capture, branding, harassment, or death..." and that they are "...an integral part of the natural system of the public lands."  Furthermore, Bureau regulation requires that wild horses and burros be considered comparably with other resource values within the area.
     The Bureau of Land Management maintains and manages wild horses or burros in "herd management areas" (HMAs).
     In the ten states where BLM manages horses, there are 270 herd areas.  In Utah, about 3,600 horses are found among 23 different herds scattered across the state.  Two hers of burros containing about 100 animals are found on public lands in southeastern Utah.


Sulphur Herd Objectives
  • Strive to maintain an ecological balance through dispersal of wild horses within the habitat and the removal of excess horses beyond the carrying capacity of the range.
  • Maintain a herd size of 135 to 180 head of adult horses above two years of age.
  • Through natural breeding, increase the number of horses displaying good conformation, color, or characteristics of the original Colonial Spanish Type horse.
  • Keep the current wild horse population as pure as possible with no introduction of outside animals into the herd area.

  • Make excess wild horses available for public adoption.
  • Develop viewing opportunities for visitors to observe wild horses in a natural setting.


Special Travel Considerations

     Take along a good map.  Detailed topographic maps provide the best information about roads and topographic features in this area.  The extensive road system in this area an be difficult to decipher unless you have a good map and the ability to navigate with it.
     Four-wheel drive and high clearance vehicles are recommended.  Seasonal rains and snow will make the roads in the management area muddy, slick, rutted, and impassable.
    Come prepared.  Make certain that you and your vehicle are properly equipped for a back country adventure.  Adequate gasoline, extra water, tire chains, tools to make repairs, a first aid kit, and making sure that someone at home knows where you are and when expected back are just a few of the basic precautions you should take whenever traveling in a remote area.


Best Viewing Opportunities

     The Needle Range is characterized by steep slopes and narrow ridges.  Access to the ridges and surrounding areas is good, provided you are driving a vehicle capable of traversing rough, back country roads.
     You will find most of the horses in the Mountain Home portion of the range.  An extensive dirt-road system provides access throughout the entire area for those properly equipped.  typically, roads wander through sagebrush flats and forests of pinyon and juniper.  The high country of Mountain Home Peak is a particularly pleasant destination, providing outstanding views of Hamlin Valley and Great Basin National Park.
    The best access to the road network within the herd area is Utah Highway 21.  Approximately 45 miles west of Milford on LI-21 look for a BLM sign marked Pots Sum Pa.  Turn south on this road to enter the northeastern portion of the Sulphur Herd Management Area.


A Few Viewing Tips

     Look in certain areas.  Scan reseeding projects and prescribed burns where forage is plentiful.
     Look for wild horses from high elevations.  Mountain Home Peak provides an excellent vantage point to look for wild horses.
     Adapt your viewing strategy to the time of year you visit.  Horses migrate to higher elevations during the warm summer months.  In late fall and spring they can be found on the benches of Hamlin and Pine Valleys.
    Take binoculars.  Wild horses are naturally wary and best viewed at a distance.  When approached they will spook and run for cover.


We Need Your Help
   We invite you to view wild horses, however it is unlawful to chase and/or catch them.  Foals, pregnant mares and older horses are easily hurt when pursued, so please allow them to live a free and unharassed life.
   Help our wild horses and burros by reporting illegal activity. Contact your BLM office or call BLM Law Enforcement at (801) 539-4286

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Wild Horse and Burro Herds in Utah (Click on map to enlarge)

     



"They are not brethren, they are not underlings; they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendor and travail of the earth." 
Henry Beston, nature writer, 1888-1968

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